Comixology (at Amazon) Sales: More Black Friday Sales From Marvel, BOOM!, IDW and Image

In this week’s Comixology (at Amazon) sales, it’s time for even more Black Friday Sales. Possibly, because it’s Black Friday? Another Marvel sale, plus BOOM!, IDW and Image.

Where did the New Releases and Sale pages go?

In case you’re having troubles with the new UIX (a LOT of people have been):

And with Black Friday now in place, here’s another batch of sales for the occasion. Earlier in the week, we broke down the Marvel Epic Collection Sale and the DC Black Friday Sale, so go back and have a look at those if you haven’t seen them.

What Have You Done For Me Lately ?

The Marvel Latest and Greatest Sale runs through Thursday, 12/1.

And yes, we’ll happily recommend three things we’ve been enjoying from this bunch:

Jed MacKay’s emerged as a writer to keep an eye on and two V. 1’s of his pop up here:

The Death of Doctor Strange is an accurate title for this MacKay/Lee Garbett series that does kill off Stephen Strange, though to say much more about this clever and twisty series would move into the realm of spoilers.

Moon Knight: The Midnight Mission is the opening act in the MacKay/Alessandro Cappuccio Moon Knight revival that’s one of the more unpredictable comics out there right now. “Mr. Knight” is trying to get his act together. He’s seeing a therapist. He’s started a sort of night mission to offer Konshu’s protection as it used to be intended. And then the vampires show up. And another avatar of Konshu. (And the subsequent acts only have more curveballs.) This one’s also an entertaining ride.

Defenders: There Are No Rules is the Al Ewing / Javier Rodriguez Defenders revival. This time out, Doctor Strange and company go dimension hopping looking to retrieve the Eternity Mask. Different realities are governed by different laws of physics (or magic), hence the title. Oh, and Galactus is involved. This story plays out on a BIG canvas and for as much of a hot streak as Ewing is on right now, Rodriguez still manages to steal the show… which is to say both writing and art are popping here.

The Death of Doctor Strange   Moon Knight   Defenders

Walt Simonson’s Other Thor

The IDW Black Friday Sale runs through Monday, 11/28.

IDW could have called this a “Best of Sale” and we’d have backed them. Plus, $0.99 for a V.1 and $1.99 for subsequent volumes on everything? What’s the word we’re looking for…  CHEAP.

Ragnarok is Walt Simonson’s return to Norse mythology. It is glorious and might just be Walt’s best work… which is saying something. And the old sales charts (back when we had sales charts) suggest a LOT of people were sleeping on this one.  Twilight of the Gods has come and gone. The Nine Worlds are reduced to the Dusk Lands and all is not well. Thor is raised from the dead, not altogether successfully, and starts a quest to set things right. Highest recommendation, especially at these prices.  Note: V.3 is listed separately from the first two.

Richard Stark’s Parker is the late Darwyn Cooke adapting Donald Westlake’s score-settling thief, Parker. Some of the best crime comics you’ll ever see, as we’ve said before. And these are the best prices we’ve seen for them, if memory serves.

Ragnarok   Ragnarok   Richard Stark's Parker

Prices Go Boom

The Best of Boom! Sale runs through Monday, 11/28.

And yes, we have another holiday V.1 for $0.99 and subsequent volumes for $1.99 sale! Cheap!

The centerpiece here is probably Once and Future, the Kieron Gillen / Dan Mora contemporary fantasy adventure about the power of stories manifesting as Merlin returns to raise King Arthur… and Arthur doesn’t care for all these immigrants. It starts out fairly breezy and is starting to get fairly dark by the time V. 4 rolls around.  V.5 wraps things up at the end of December, so this is a cheap catchup on a book we’ve enjoyed.

The Many Deaths of Laila Starr by Ram V and Filipe Andrade chronicles Death’s relationship with the inventor of immortality and is probably the best reviewed book of the sale.

House of Slaughter by James Tynion IV, Tate Brombal, Werther Dell‘Edera and Chris Shehan is a spin-off from Something Is Killing the Children, set in a school run by the Order of monster hunters that Erica Slaughter is butting heads with. Tonally, this is a very different book. It’s more of an angsty CW series set in the same universe.

Once & Future   The Many Deaths of Laila Starr   House of Slaughter

Sale of Large Sizes

The Image Omnibus & Deluxe Edition Sale runs through Monday, 11/28.

A heads up we hope you heed: Image Deluxe Editions are hardcovers and the discount is based on the HC price. Depending on the sale, it’s frequently cheaper to get the digital edition of the two “regular” collections than a Deluxe Edition containing the equivalent of two regular collections. Keep an eye on what you’re buying.

That said, some of the omnibuses are good deals, so let’s have a look at those and see what they cost per issue, shall we?

Saga Compendiumby Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples is $23.99 and collects #1-54. That’s less than 45 cents/issue ($0.444/issue). That’s a good deal and Saga’s reputation speaks for itself.

Paper Girls: The Complete Story by Brian K. Vaughan and Cliff Chiang is $19.99 and collects all 30 issues.  That’s a hair under 67 cents/issue ($0.666/issue). Not as cheap as the Saga Compendium, but beats a $0.99 single issue sale. You may have seen the Amazon Prime video adaptation. The comic is better.

Saga   Paper Girls

The Fade Out by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips isn’t really an omnibus, it’s just the whole 12 issue miniseries in one volume. This one’s a noir murder mystery set in the Golden Age of Hollywood. It’s Brubaker and Phillips. They’re pretty gosh darn consistent, so you probably already know if you’ll like it. We certainly did, but we’re easy marks for those two.

Curse Words: The Hole Damned Thing Omnibus by Charles Soule and Ryan Browne is roughly 30 issues worth for $19.99, so basically the same deal as Paper Girls. This is a dark farce about an evil Wizard named Wizord who’s feuding with some wizards who are more evil and maybe… maybe… he’s open to changing his ways. Another quality piece of entertainment.

Astro City Metrobook V. 1 by Kurt Busiek, Brent Anderson and Alex Ross is $11.99 for the first 18 issues of the various incarnations of Astro City… which ends up being the same price per issue as Paper Girls and Curse Words. In a nutshell, Astro City is everything good about superheroes distilled into a new universe. Everything will feel a little familiar and the early issues are about capturing the magic of the Silver Age. Astro City is a great palette-cleanser if Event Comics are trying your patience!

The Fade Out    Curse Words   Astro City Metrobook

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Still On Sale

Comixology (at Amazon) Sales: Moon Knight and a Deep Dive into Dark Horse Horror

This week in Comixology (at Amazon) sales, we try to explain Moon Knight comics to the uninitiated – it’s complicated – and then we take a deep dive into that big Dark Horse horror sale that Amazon has no idea how to display with any semblance of organization!

(Disclosure: If you buy something we link to on our site, we may earn commissions)

Where did the New Releases and Sale pages go?

In case you’re having troubles with the new UIX (a LOT of people have been):

By the Light of Moon

Marvel’s Moon Knight sale runs through Sunday, 5/1.

First things first, you need to understand that Moon Knight is sort of Marvel’s version of Hawkman, in terms of there being wildly varying takes on the character. Having seen the first episode of the TV show… that sort of looked like yet another take on the character and we’re not sure if any of the comics will really reflect that version… we’ll know more after a couple episodes.

So, Moon Knight starts out in Werewolf by Night, has some guest appearances, a solo run as backup in Hulk magazine (non-code and its bloody for the time period) and starts his own solo comic.  The team most associated with the original Moon Knight is Doug Moench and Bill Sienkiewicz. (Moench and Don Perlin being co-creators back in Werewolf by Night.) In the beginning, Moon Knight was considered Marvel’s Batman. More accurately (that fan-driven tagline lacks nuance), Moon Knight was drawing from Batman’s pulp magazine influences. One of those influences was The Shadow, a proto-superhero of sorts who adopted multiple identities to further his goals… including assuming the identity of a millionaire.

In the beginning, much like the Shadow, ex-mercenary Marc Spector adopted the identity of Steven Grant, millionaire (much like The Shadow’s Lamont Cranston) and Jake Lockley, cab driver. There was no disassociated identity disorder in the beginning. The identities were tools and perhaps there was a bit of drama with method actors having trouble getting out of character.  (It’s also worth noting Denny O’Neil was the editor on the Moon Knight solo series and had written The Shadow at DC a few years earlier.) There was occasionally a supernatural element lurking in the background, but there was a certain degree of plausible deniability about what was happening and to what extent spooky things were really magical.

The original run is in the Epic Collections. In typical Amazon fashion, they screwed up the listings, so let’s fix that:

V. 1, “Bad Moon Rising,” is all the original guest appearances, the Hulk Magazine appearances and the first 4 issues of the ongoing series.

V.2 -3 contain the rest of the original run. Now – fair warning. Moench eventually leaves for DC to write Batman after issue #33 and the series ends with 38. It’s not same without him.

  Moon Knight Epic Collection

And after Marvel must have realized they were having trouble replacing Moench, they decided to tweak the character with the next series, Moon Knight: Fist of Khonshu, which… does not appear to have been reprinted. Possibly because we don’t personally know anyone who liked it. But it played up the mystical elements and Marc Spector’s resurrections.

There were a few attempts to continue the series. Nothing really took and the West Coast Avengers appearances could be the most notable for the middle section of Moon Knight’s history. Much of this solo period isn’t reprinted.

And things got to the point where Brian Bendis and Alex Maleev did a 12 part series where Moon Knight is delusional and so mentally ill as to be barely functional. If you’ve never read the character before, it’s a fairly entertaining comic. We interpreted it as frequently playing for laughs. If you liked the Moench character… oof. And this series pretty much broke the character and Marvel’s been trying to “fix” him ever since.

Seems like every series since has been attempting to establish a new status quo for the character, picking up pieces from the previous incarnation.

If you want something close to the TV show (and again, we’re working with only having seen the first episode here), we think your best bet might be the excellent Jeff Lemire / Greg Smallwood series where Marc Spector is confronting his many identities and his… unusual relationship with the Egyptian deity, Khonshu.

Moon Knight

And actually, we’re enjoying the current Moon Knight series by Jed Mackay and Alessandro Cappuccio, which finds Specter alternately billing himself as Mr. Knight and Moon Knight, going to therapy, operating a “Night Mission” to fulfill his obligations as a priest of Khonshu (albeit something of a renegade priest) while mixing it up with vampires, a rival priest and a madman initiating a conspiracy against him. We’re six issues in and it’s one of the better takes on the character in a while.

Moon Knight

Horror <> Hodor

The Dark Horse Horror Sale runs though Monday, 4/4.

This is one of those very large sales that the Amazon UIX is ill-equipped to handle, in terms of easy browsing, so we’ll flip through it so you don’t have to.

  • The Hellboy Omnibus series at $6.99 a pop is a helluva good deal (pun intended). Mike Mignola’s iconic horror adventure series is a classic and you should already be aware of it.
  • The E.C. Archives are also (mostly) $6.99 each. An all-star lineup of talent that inspired the comics code! For the unfamiliar, these were most famous as prestige horror comics in the early 1950s, as well as the beginning of Mad. There’s some well known war material, too. Harvey Kurtzman, Wally Wood, Al Williamson, Jack Davis, Al Feldstein… even a little Ray Bradbury, if memory serves.
  • Witchfinder Omnibus (both of them) – another Mignola verse historical horror series, with John Arcudi, Chris Robeson and Ben Stenbeck, among others.
  • Falconspeare – A recent (January ’22) Mike Mignola / Warwick Johnson-Caldwell Victorian murder mystery… about the disappearance of a vampire hunter. New enough we haven’t had a chance to read it yet.
  • Baltimore Omnibus – In a world where the vampires ran wild at the end of WWI, Lord Baltimore pursues a vendetta against them.  We read the set a few months back and enjoyed it. Mignola/Christopher Golden writing, Ben Stenbeck leads the art roster.
  • Creepy Archives – The ’60s/’70s horror magazine from Warren.
  • Eerie Archives – Also from the old Warren files, Creepy’s companion magazine
  • Grendel Omnibus – The collected Grendel, going back to the ’80s by Matt Wagner and friends. Hmmm… is there a TV show coming?
  • Grendel: Devil’s Odyssey – Matt Wagner’s latest Grendel series, released in January, ’22.
  • B.P.R.D is NOT centrally listed, so we’ll put it all under this heading. These are the adventures of Hellboy’s colleagues at the BPRD and it’s one long saga. It’s also really good. We revisited it a couple years back and it holds up. You _do_ need to read it in this order, though:
  • Abe Sapien Omnibuses – They actually have done quite a bit of Abe solo material.
  • The Seeds – An excellent science fiction tale by Ann Nocenti and David Aja that mashes up themes of eco-disaster, alien invasions and forbidden love.
  • Harrow County Omnibus The long running Cullen Bunn / Tyler Crook backwoods witchcraft series.
  • Beasts of Burden – The neighborhood dogs (and a cat) battle the forces of darkness. Critically acclaimed series by Even Dorkin, Jill Thompson and Benjamin Dewey.
  • Lobster Johnson – We do love The Lobster, Mignola’s homage to ’30s pulp heroes with a rotating cast of co-creators. This is an odd series of mini-series, that run from silly to horror to thriller. The omnibus will finally come out… next week in HC, so these are “regular” collections.
  • Kabuki Omnibus – A nearly forgotten buzz book of the 90s by David Mack, as an assassin in Japan reassess her lot in life amidst conspiracies. Is the Sony TV adaption still happening? We haven’t heard anything about that lately.  An influential comic.
  • She Could  Fly– Before Marvel snagged him, Christopher Cantwell was working on this super powered series from Dark Horse with Martin Marazzo. We’ve been meaning to give it a look and have heard good things.

If you want to just browse the collected editions, your least bad option (Amazon doesn’t give you a good, sorted option) might be to sort the price from high to low.  The 99-cent issues will then start on page 38 (or did for us).

There’s a LOT more in there, but those were the highlights we noticed. In general, the omnibus editions are, by far, your best bang for the buck.

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Also On Sale

Comixology Sales: X-Men, Superman, Moon Knight, Tarzan and a WIDE sale at IDW (with an extra 50% off for CU subscribers)

This week’s Comixology Sales include a visit from the classic X-Men era, Superman, Tarzan over at Dark Horse, Moon Knight and we seem to have uncovered an unadvertised 50% off sale at IDW that stacks on a deep graphic novel sale.

(Disclosure: If you buy something we link to on our site, we may earn commission.)

Not Brand Xs

The Marvel Uncanny X-Men Legacy Sale runs through Sunday, 7/18.

Probably better to view the items on the sale page for this one. The graphic novel section for the Uncanny X-Men series on Comixology is a real mess.  What? Marvel overproducing X-Men graphic novels in strange combinations?  Surely not!

The best buys here are the Epic Collections and Marvel Masterworks collections (which get thicker as the series go on). We like the Epic’s a little better, but pick your poison.

X-Men Epic Collection

Point of Origin

The Marvel Origins Sale runs through Sunday, 7/18 and it’s an odd one.

Wolverine: Origin, the Marvel “Season One” OGNs from a few years back and some origin story anthologies.  Browse for yourself.

Wolverine: Origin

Crescent Moon

The Marvel Moon Knight Sale runs through Thursday, 7/22.

While pretty much all the runs are here, we’ve always been of the opinion that the Moon Knight you need is the one before the insanity questions started — the (mostly) Moench/Sienkiewicz era.  There are three Epic Collections for this and that’s where you should definitely start. Visits from Morpheus and The Werewolf always make for an interesting evening.

Moon Knight Epic Collection

Up, Up and on Sale

The DC Superman Sale runs through Monday, 7/19.

We’re assuming you already know about All-Star Superman, so let’s talk about some other interesting Superman titles.

Here at the Tower of Cheap, we are HUGE fans of Steve Gerber’s Superman.  Yes, he of Howard the Duck and Man-Thing fame.  Superman: Phantom Zone is a collection of the mini-series of the same name (drawn by Gene Colan) and the DC Comics Presents follow up (drawn by Rick Veitch). This is a dark fantasy horror take on Superman and the Phantom Zone mythos. Come for the interdimensional prison, stay for the Kryptonian sorcerer.  Highly recommended.

For something in the opposite direction, more recent and YA focused, there’s Superman Smashes the Klan where the Gene Yuen Lang and Gurihiru reinterpret the classic 1940s radio serial.

Superman: Phantom Zone  Superman Smashes The Klan

Lord of the Jungle

The Dark Horse Welcome to the Jungle Sale runs through Monday, 7/19.

We would draw your attention to Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Tarzan: The Complete Joe Kubert Years. By all accounts, that was a passion project for Kubert and a run that the pros talk about. With that sale, you can get the full run for less than any single volume of the 3 part archive editions.  There’s a bit more Tarzan (we picked up the “regular” omnibus a couple days ago) and some Tomb Raider, but this is the top of the heap.

Joe Kubert's Tarzan

Thor’s Not Dead

The IDW Graphic Novel Sale runs through Monday, 8/2.  And there’s a bonus here. We can’t find the announcement of this sale, so we can’t tell you how long it’s going to last, but as we type this IDW is 50% off for Comixology Unlimited subscribers, so jump on this in hurry if that’s you?  The discount stacks and that makes for some rock bottom prices.

There’s a ton of stuff here – TMNT, Star Trek, Bloom County, Transformers, Locke & Key, My Little Pony and so forth… but our favorite IDW series on sale is Walt Simonson’s Ragnarokwhere Thor… half-survives the Twilight of the Gods and has a score to settle.  Comixology has this broken up into two series for unknown reasons.  You can get the first two volumes here and the volume 3 is a different link.

Ragnarok   

Still on Sale